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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a final rule to curb lung cancer, silicosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and kidney disease in America’s workers by limiting their exposure to respirable crystalline silica. The rule is comprised of two standards, one for Construction and one for General Industry and Maritime.

OSHA estimates that the rule will save over 600 lives and prevent more than 900 new cases of silicosis each year, once its effects are fully realized. The Final Rule is projected to provide net benefits of about $7.7 billion, annually.

About 2.3 million workers are exposed to respirable crystalline silica in their workplaces, including 2 million construction workers who drill, cut, crush, or grind silica-containing materials such as concrete and stone, and 300,000 workers in general industry operations such as brick manufacturing, foundries, and hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking. Responsible employers have been protecting workers from harmful exposure to respirable crystalline silica for years, using widely-available equipment that controls dust with water or a vacuum system.

Key Provisions

  • Reduces the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for respirable crystalline silica to 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air, averaged over an 8-hour shift.
  • Requires employers to: use engineering controls (such as water or ventilation) to limit worker exposure to the PEL; provide respirators when engineering controls cannot adequately limit exposure; limit worker access to high exposure areas; develop a written exposure control plan, offer medical exams to highly exposed workers, and train workers on silica risks and how to limit exposures.
  • Provides medical exams to monitor highly exposed workers and gives them information about their lung health.
  • Provides flexibility to help employers — especially small businesses — protect workers from silica exposure.

One of the first considerations is how the flooding happened. Flooding can occur in storm periods or near bodies of water from the outside environment near the residence. Flood damage is a common problem after a fire, due to the fact that what is necessary to extinguish the fire affects several areas in the house. However, flooding can also come from inside the home, from broken or malfunctioning plumbing or pipe work. When you find the source of excess water, you can determine the type of water causing damage in your house.

There are three main classifications of water: clean, gray, and black. Clean water has very few harmful substances in it, for example, when water supply lines are broken, spilling forth clean, fresh water. It can certainly still cause water damage, but there is little chance of bacteria or chemicals causing illness following the flooding. When sinks or tubs spillover, the water is also usually considered clean. Gray water, formally referred to as category 2 water, can cause sicknesses and physical problems because the amount of pollutants in the water is considerable. These impurities may be chemical, biological, and/or physical. Gray water will have micro-organisms present as well. Some good examples of water damage with category 2 implications are sump pump breakdowns, flows from dishwashers, defective washing machines, or leaking toilets(containing urine but not feces). Black water, or category 3 water, has a serious level of toxins and is very unsanitary. This water is highly disposed to induce physical issues, illness, or discomfort. Black water has microorganisms, fungi, chemical pollutants, and other dangerous materials. Category 3 water damage may emerge from lakes, streams, rivers, seawater, ground surface water, sewage leaks, overrunning toilets with fecal material, and stationary water that stands for 48-72 hours after a category 1 or 2 flood problem. The standing of the water increases its dangerous contaminants. Black water clean-up requires the use of protective gear and specific gear to prevent disease or wellness problems as well as safeguard the structure. Trusting clean up and restoration to experts can assist you get your house back rapidly and safely.


There is a a lot of information that can be gathered about mold cleaning. Some of them are true and some are nothing but purely air-popped claims. The use of bleach for an effective mold remediation is one of those that causes confusion in today's quest for a mold-free indoor environment.

The dizziness that bleach creates resides on the argument whether the use of it can indeed kill molds or not. Because bleach had been around for like many many years now, a lot believes that yes, the use of it can make a mold removal process effective. But as been said, not everything should be always believed.

Basically, the most appropriate point that can be presented with regards to the use of bleach in mold cleaning is this: bleach can kill molds but not always. There are some mold infestation cases in which any cleaning move is nothing but a futile attempt. It can sometimes produce no result and even in cases that it does, it sure wouldn't be as good as what have been expected.

Instances to which bleach can sure serve well and effective are often on mold infestation on hard and non-porous surfaces such as tiles and concrete. To porous materials on the other hand, purchasing and applying of bleach can cause waste instead of being a help.

So why is it that bleach is not always as effective in mold cleaning as many claim it to be? The following can be of help for better understanding.

  • Bleach is not specifically formulated for a complete mold removal. It is regarded as an all-around cleaner which conjures the idea that it always effectively kill molds. However, this is not entirely true as bleach is largely made up of water that encourages molds to grow. Therefore, bleach can sometimes kill molds but it can not prevent their regrowth.
  • To entirely get rid of molds, their roots must be cut off. Unfortunately, bleach can only reach the external surface and does not go deeper on the root level. This makes it unable to cut the roots which make molds capable of regrowing.
  • Bleach is made of chlorine which is a chemical element. Though it can be useful as a disinfectant, it can also be destructive to human health and the environment. Inhaling chlorine can cause damage to the respiratory system, can lead to coughing and vomiting and can also irritate the eyes. Its major negative contribution to the environment lies on the destruction of the ozone layer.
  • The rather small potential bleach has in removing molds deteriorates fast. Its power can reduce to half when stored or unused within 90 days.
  • When the mold removal process is to be implanted on fabrics, wood or paper, the use of bleach can speed up the deterioration of the item.

In conclusion, bleach can actually work in removing molds. But it then it has some considerable limitations. Those limitations make bleach a not-so-ideal product to for a truly effective mold cleaning process.

Black Mold May Cause Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Miscarriage

Mold & Moisture

The crawl space is the number one source for potential moisture entering your home. The moisture may be equal to gallons of water but in vapor form and not even visible. A seal tight liner kit will instantly stop the moisture in the crawl space from entering home as well as eliminating radon gas, musty odors, mildew and mold.

"The U.S. EPA states: "Molds are usually not a problem unless mold spores land on a wet or damp spot and begin growing. Molds produce allergens, irritants and potentially toxic substances. The key to mold control is moisture control. The mold will not grow if moisture is not present (source: EPA " A Brief Guide to Mold, Mildew and Your Home," publication #402-K-02-003)."

Eliminate the Existing Mold

To eliminate and prevent future mold growth, spray the affected areas with a mold killing and growth preventing spray, there are good products for purchase at your local building supply house.

My Take on the Problems with Bleach

The Myth Of Using Bleach To Kill Mold! Mold has a root system that actually grows into the surfaces of wood, drywall, concrete, etc..., like tree roots grow into the soil. The roots are not killed by bleach alone because the bleach does not penetrate the surface of porous materials. The bleach chemical portion sits on the surface until gassing off, killing only the mold on the surface leaving the roots intact, while the water portion of the bleach soaks into the material giving the mold roots a food source to start growing again. Think of it this way, if you were to cut a tree, plant, grass, or anything that has roots down and you water the area, you will see what you cut start to grow again. This is because the roots were not killed. The other problem with using bleach for an extended period is that if sprayed on wood and other building materials it actually starts to break down the products.

STOPPING MOLD AT THE ROOTS IS THE ONLY WAY!!!

Chlorine Bleach is NOT a registered EPA Mold Killing product!

If you think that we're just knocking bleach. Don't take our word for it! Go to http://epa.gov/mold/moldcourse/index.html and read what the EPA has to say about using bleach to kill mold. The EPA says that "The use of bleach is not recommended as a routine practice during mold clean-up" http://iaq.custhelp.com question #7.

Now you might ask: How do I kill mold if not with bleach?

Answer: Use an EPA approved and registered fungicide to kill the mold at its roots.